Moms Helping Moms

Written by Amy Dee Stephens in the August 2020 Issue

Moms helping moms

Ally Myers is a mom on a mission. Several missions, actually. She’s helping moms re-enter the workforce, and she’s supporting moms with sick children.

It started a few years ago when Ally’s baby experienced liver complications. Meeting with specialists opened her eyes to
the world of women forced to leave the workplace to care for children needing weekly hospital visits. “This was their normal, and it was potentially my new normal. Having a child with serious needs is not the lifestyle any mom expects—and she can no
longer fit into the traditional workforce,” Ally said.

Moms On A Mission

Ally felt called to help encourage these moms as they “walked through the fire.” She founded Moms on a Mission, providing encouragement and financial support to special needs moms. As she helped different moms, she also noticed a need to help moms re-enter the workforce.

“At some point, 43% of women with children leave work for a time. Once moms are ready to go back to work, they face real obstacles, because they have a resume gap of five to eight years. The technology and jargon has changed, too, so these bright, talented women have to catch up. And no mom wants to go into an interview and say, ‘I need to drop my child off in the morning.’”

Matching Moms to a Career

To tear down these barriers, Ally created Suma, a company focused on matching moms to a career, whether it be full-time, part-time or freelance employment. Suma helps moms prepare their application packets, find needed training, and even provide a personal stylist. “After dressing like a mom for awhile, that eight-year-old suit jacket might not fit anymore,” Ally said. “We want moms to put their best self forward.”

Employers pay just $75 for the Suma service, in which they receive three qualified applicants to review. Instead of focusing on a specific kind of career, Suma focuses on the mom—helping her enter the career that fits, whether she’s an accountant, writer or attorney.

“More employers are recognizing that women are talented and productive. Moms care for their children, but they have more to give. They’ve been gone awhile, but they are amazingly talented. These women have drive.”

Making a Lasting Impact

Ally became emotional as she reflected on her journey to help moms. “I went to a restaurant and saw a mom sitting at a table working on her laptop. I’d never met her before—but I recognized her, because I’d reviewed her resume packet and video. We felt instantly connected. This woman was so happy with her work—and she had faced real obstacles to get there.” Ally paused, wiping away tears. “I was so encouraged. It was like a stamp of approval that I was doing this for the right reasons. I think my seven-year-old daughter summed up what I do best one day when she said, ‘Mom, you’re finding the right people with the right heart.’”

Or maybe it’s that Ally has the right heart--especially for moms.

Learn more at www.Sumawork.com or www.Momsonmissions.org 

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