The Golf Game You Should Be Playing

 

Written by Tara Lynn Thompson in the June 2017 Issue

There are fewer boundaries in golf than in most sports. No out of bounds. No fouls. Just trees and mud and water and sand tempting you to challenge them. And, yet, every golfer brings his own set of restrictions to the course. Either in his head or in his swing. So, how do you remove those restrictions? 

 

Andy Dillard, also known as “Bib” on the PGA Tour, spent 20 years playing professional golf at places like Pebble Beach, known for its bewitching 18th hole next to the Pacific Ocean. He’s played with golf legends like Payne Steward, as well as The Golden Bear himself, Jack Nicklaus.

 

 If you want to open your golf game to a whole new level of satisfaction and achievement, here are Andy’s seven tips to get you playing the golf game you should be playing.

 

1 Expect nothing and everything. 

“The best thing people can do is have no expectations on the golf course. When you play golf, you’re really dealing with 90% failure. Golf is about having things you don’t want to happen happening all day. So prepare yourself mentally before you play.”

 

2 Alignment, alignment, alignment. 

“From the beginner to the best player in the world, the most abused common denominator in everyone’s golf game is alignment. When setting up before your shot, make your feet and shoulders parallel to your target line.”

 

3 Sand trap of the mind. 

“Everything about golf is against human nature. There is a battle within yourself to control your thoughts and emotions, which, if you succeed, will allow you to play your best game. To do this, stay positive. Shots will rarely go where you want them to go. So, when bad shots happen, forget them and move on.” 

 

4 Hand it to you.

“Releasing the club is something you never want to do, unless it’s a bunker shot. Otherwise, it’s a recipe for a disaster.” 

 

5 There is no try.

“Don’t work at your game. You work at your job, you practice a game. You should always want to play good, but don’t try to play good. Trying creates anxiety.” 

 

6 A shortcut 

“The short game accounts for the majority of your golf game and the area players practice the least. To improve your short game, work on your putter path by putting two sticks down like a train track, then practice with your putter going back and forth straight through.” 

 

7 Couldn’t care less

“The best way to play golf is like you don’t care. Golf gives you too much time to think, instead of many sports which require instant reaction. To get out of your head, keep your thoughts as simple, as positive, and as in the moment

as possible.”

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